Home » Entertainment » Books » 7 Classic Novels To Add To Your Bookshelf

7 Classic Novels To Add To Your Bookshelf

What’s a bookshelf without a few loved classic novels? Imagine curling up with a warm drink to a tale that transports you to the green fields of a Victorian country-side, the streets of fashionable London, or the southern ranches of North America. Have no clue what classics to add to your bookshelf? Worry not, bookworms. Here are 7 classic novels to give your bookshelf an extra classic touch.

 

Frankenstein By Mary Shelly (1818)

Penguin.com.au

Penguin.com.au

A Gothic tale merging the natural with the supernatural, Frankenstein is not as horrifying as it sounds.

 

Jane Eyre By Charlotte Brontë (1847)

Penguin.com.au

Penguin.com.au

Jane Eyre is self- realisation at it’s finest. The eponymous heroine’s outspokenness and courage is refreshing bearing in mind the mentality of Brontë’s society at the time.

 

Middlemarch By George Eliot (1871-2)

Tower.com

Tower.com

Love, marriage, finance, science, religion and family. Middlemarch covers it all in this great classic. Readers of Middlemarch have got to be in it for the long run.

 

The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald (1925)

Lifeonthebluehighway.com

Lifeonthebluehighway.com

Elegantly written and captivating, The Great Gatsby will take you into the dazzling yet frivolous world of the Jazz Age. Fitzgerald’s command of the English langauge is remarkable. The plot may have you yelling at a few characters.

 

Of Mice and Men By John Steinbeck (1937)

Amazon.co.uk

Amazon.co.uk

A tale of friendship and the American Dream, Of Mice and Men follows the characters George and Lennie as they aspire to eventually manage their own ranch.

 

Animal Farm By George Orwell (1945)

Tewl.org

Tewl.org

For the historically inclined and those clued-up about political regimes, Animal Farm needs a place on your shelf if it isn’t already there, crumpled and creased from being read many times. What a genius idea to use animals to illustrate communism!

 

The Lonely Londoners By Sam Selvon (1956)

image

Race and identity and the enormous task of grappling with life as a new Londoner lays at the heart of The Lonely Londoners. London is seen through the eyes of African and Caribbean characters. Prepare yourself bittersweet for moments.

 

 

Share this article

share we chat more

About Chermaine Sowah

A blogger and content writer. A keen reader.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

Skip to toolbar